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EORI Library

EORI Library

The Enhanced Oil Recovery Institute (EORI) was created and is financially supported by the Wyoming State Legislature to work with Wyoming oil producers to increase oil production, and as result, increase tax revenues of the state.

EORI works to help the State of Wyoming and its energy producers to recover a large resource of stranded oil in depleted oil reservoirs as rapidly, responsibly, and economically as possible. 

As a part of our implementing our mission we have conducted and facilitated studies, presentations and other documents on the topic of Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR). These documents are broken into subcategories to help you find the information pertinent to each topic. 

 

 

Geology

Enhanced Oil Recovery Institute of Wyoming documents, studies & presentations relating to the topic of geology.

Engineering

Enhanced Oil Recovery Institute of Wyoming documents, studies & presentations relating to the topic of engineering.

Economics

Enhanced Oil Recovery Institute of Wyoming documents, studies & presentations relating to the topic of economics.

Data

Enhanced Oil Recovery Institute of Wyoming documents, studies & presentations relating to the topic of data.

Regulations

Enhanced Oil Recovery Institute of Wyoming documents, studies & presentations relating to the topic of regulations.

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Flue-Gas carbon capture on Carbonaceous Sorbents: Toward a Low-Cost Multifunctional carbon filter for

This work is motivated by the need for inexpensive carboncapture technology for combustion-based power plants. Such power plants produce electricity by converting coal or natural gas to carbon dioxide (CO2), which is normally vented as an 11%-12% component of flue gas that contains a balance of nitrogen and other minor components. Separating CO2 from such a flue-gas mixture poses no special technical problems for the known absorption, pressure-swing adsorption (PSA), and membrane technologies. However, these technologies have a tendency to be expensive for two principal reasons: the hot flue gas is produced at low pressure and the separated component (CO2) is highly dilute with an inert component (nitrogen).